What Dimension Of Assimilation Involves Change In Self Identity?

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Written By Muhammad Saad

I'm a psychologist dedicated to evidence-based research in psychology, covering diverse aspects of the field.

Exploring the depths of assimilation? Let’s dive into the dimension where self-identity takes center stage. Imagine a journey where every step reshapes who you are at your core.

It’s like a metamorphosis, where you emerge not just different, but transformed. In this dimension, change isn’t just inevitable—it’s the very essence of growth. So, buckle up and get ready to navigate the ever-shifting landscape of self-identity in the realm of assimilation!

What Is Assimilation?

Assimilation is a social process in which individuals or groups from different cultural backgrounds adopt the customs, values, and behaviors of a dominant culture. This process often involves a gradual change in the minority group’s language, practices, and identity to align with those of the majority group.

Let’s illustrate assimilation with an example. Imagine a family from Mexico moving to the United States. In their home country, they speak Spanish, celebrate Mexican holidays, and enjoy traditional Mexican food. However, after moving to the U.S., they begin to adopt American customs.

They start speaking English, celebrating American holidays like Thanksgiving, and enjoying American food like hamburgers and apple pie. Over time, they become more integrated into American society, adopting its values and norms. This is an example of assimilation.

It’s important to note that assimilation is not about completely abandoning one’s original culture. The Mexican family in our example may still speak Spanish at home, cook traditional Mexican meals, and celebrate Mexican holidays. Assimilation is about finding a balance between maintaining one’s cultural heritage and adapting to a new cultural environment.

Relationship Between Self Identity And Assimilation

The relationship between self-identity and assimilation is a complex and multifaceted one. Assimilation often involves changes in various aspects of an individual’s life, including their language, behavior, values, and attitudes. However, one of the most significant changes that can occur during assimilation is a shift in self-identity.

Self-identity refers to an individual’s sense of who they are, including their values, beliefs, and affiliations. When individuals assimilate into a new culture, they may begin to adopt the values, beliefs, and customs of that culture. This process can lead to changes in their self-identity, as they start to see themselves as part of the new culture.

The relationship between self-identity and assimilation can be both positive and negative. On the one hand, adopting a new self-identity can be empowering, as individuals may feel a sense of belonging and acceptance in their new culture. This can lead to increased self-esteem and overall well-being.

On the other hand, the process of changing one’s self-identity can also be difficult and emotionally challenging, as individuals may feel a sense of loss or disconnection from their original culture.

It’s important to note that the relationship between self-identity and assimilation is not a one-way street. While assimilation can lead to changes in self-identity, an individual’s self-identity can also influence the degree to which they assimilate. For example, individuals who have a strong sense of identity and connection to their original culture may be less likely to fully assimilate into a new culture.

What Dimension Of Assimilation Involves Change In Self Identity?

The dimension of assimilation that involves a change in self-identity is often referred to as “identification assimilation” (Alba & Nee, 2003). In simple terms, it’s when individuals start to see themselves as part of the new culture, not just as outsiders. This doesn’t mean they forget their original culture, but they develop a new sense of belonging.

Imagine moving to a new country. At first, everything is different, and you see yourself as a visitor. But as time passes, you start to adopt the local customs, language, and values. You begin to feel a connection with the new culture, and you start to identify yourself as part of it. That’s identification assimilation.

This process can be challenging and may lead to what’s known as “identity crisis” (Erikson, 1968). It’s a stage where individuals struggle to reconcile their original identity with the new one. However, with time and patience, many people are able to integrate both identities into a cohesive self-concept.

It’s important to note that identification assimilation is not a one-way street. It’s a mutual process where both the majority and minority groups learn and adapt from each other. This creates a more diverse and inclusive society where everyone feels valued and respected.

References

  • Gordon, M. M. (1964). Assimilation in American life: The role of race, religion, and national origins. Oxford University Press.
  • Berry, J. W. (2005). Acculturation: Living successfully in two cultures. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 29(6), 697-712.
  • Alba, R., & Nee, V. (2003). Remaking the American mainstream: Assimilation and contemporary immigration. Harvard University Press.
  • Phinney, J. S. (1990). Ethnic identity in adolescents and adults: Review of research. Psychological Bulletin, 108(3), 499-514.
  • Alba, R., & Nee, V. (2003). Remaking the American mainstream: Assimilation and contemporary immigration. Harvard University Press.
  • Erikson, E. H. (1968). Identity: Youth and Crisis. W. W. Norton & Company.

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